Hee Ran Lee 이 희란


Hee Ran Lee 이 희란

Interview with Hee Ran Lee
February 2018
 
This interview has been lightly edited for clarity.
 
AHL: It feels as though the avant-garde performance artists of the Sixties and Seventies in Korea are being forgotten. Why do you think that is?
 
HRL: Performance is based on the body, and I suspect that this trend of overlooking those artists come from Korean society’s taboo on the physicality of the body. The body is the center of art, and the acts that come from it can be aggressive, explicit and reflect society’s view of sex. That’s uncomfortable. Something that is uncomfortable to look at is a difficult subject for discourse.
 
AHL: You majored in acting. At what point did you consider expanding outside of acting into performing?
 
HRL: There wasn’t any specific incident. My interest changed gradually as to what I considered compelling work. Acting is something I cannot do on my own. There needs to be a person to act with, a producer, a script writer for the text. I wanted to create my own voice. I wanted to break out of the standards of acting style or a traditional stage set up to freely make my own voice heard. That’s why I approached the genre of performance art. Performance has two roots - one in art and the other in theater, but I was naturally drawn to the work that didn’t stem from a text, but from one’s own body, physique, act or consciousness or thought.
 
AHL: Do you mean works such as Allan Kaprow’s Happenings?
 
HRL: Yes. If you look at the Open Theater or the Living Theater which was active in the Fifties and Sixties, the actor becomes the writer. The producer becomes the writer, the actor becomes the producer, and the collaborative practice is taking shape. I wanted to do something like that.
 
AHL: You perform in your own works. It appears to you that your body is crucial.
 
HRL: The performance art I think of starts with an action. Actions come from a movement of the body. It is important that the body movement stems from my thinking, my mind and my sensation. One of the typical questions asked of artists is, “What’s your inspiration?” or “What inspired the work?” I think my inspiration is my tension. I don’t mean tension as an emotional state of excitement, but something that becomes a basis for my bodily sensation, my emotion or my action. For example, it may be something like an uncomfortable situation or an event that arises in my day to day life - something that could be very trivial, that could have happened in my private space, private relationships or in my public situation as a woman, a Korean or as an artist. There are things that invoke a tension in me, such as passing through U.S. immigration at an airport, which creates tremendous tension. I haven’t done anything wrong nor am I an illegal immigrant, yet when I have to go through immigration control I find it so hard to bear. Also, when I have to meet someone in a position of power, I feel the tension. I am sure it’s because I know his or her power is unreasonably pushing against me. There are powerful people who have amassed tremendous amounts of money, and then that leads me to think about capitalism. If the person in power is a man, I think about women’s rights, naturally. If we keep going like this to dig deeper into myself, the origin of this train of thought and what moves me is ‘tension’. My practice expands on this motif.
 
AHL: Yet when you are composing your work, you aren’t re-creating that tension, but digesting it to express it in a different form. Do you consider the reaction of the audience when you do this?
 
HRL: The audience is very important. When I first started my practice, however, I didn’t consider them all that important. My actions were more important. But as time passed, I realized that my action, the objects I place and the given time and space collide to create an environment and that in that the audience cannot be merely spectators. The reaction of the audience exists, and that reaction is the tension I had when I created that work. It could be curiosity, but the source of the emotion, sensation or act by the audience is my tension. My tension is now the audience’s tension. I had to keep thinking. How can I make the audience participate eagerly so that their participation completes my performance?
 
AHL: One of your earlier works, In Braids, 2011, features your body in an extremely constricted space, a staircase, where you perform by yourself for 3 hours. What the audience can do in that situation is naturally limited, including showing any response. However, your most recent works are incomplete without the response of the audience.
 
HRL: The nature of performance calls for the importance of audience participation. You can’t repeat the same action. The reaction of the audience is also an action. You cannot repeat that. Just as you can’t put your feet into the same flow of water. Time keeps flowing. Time keeps flowing. Time keeps flowing. Even if I repeat the same words, these words are all different words. When a performance is repeated, I perceive it as a different performance and I wanted to put my thoughts into it. I want to show the audience how I see those who are with me there and then that they are my collaborators.
 
AHL: I want to talk about two of your works, 50 Bulbs, 2015 and Blow It!!, 2012. Both are works which are fairly uncomfortable for an audience. Why do think they are so popular? In the case of Blow It!!, you are using a noisy and smelly leafblower, you blow a balloon up until it takes over the entire space, and there is nothing very comfortable about it. Why is it that you are requested to repeat this performance? What was behind your thinking in making this piece?
 
HRL: At the time I was very much concerned with my body. I saw my body as an Asian body. It wasn’t a concern I had when I was living in Korea. It is because here I am a stranger and something is different that I started thinking about it. It was around 2010 when I was studying feminism at school and probably over-conscious about it. I am shorter than the average person. I am also told that I look very charming or agreeable. I heard things like how cute I was, or how feminine, especially when I was an actress. For female actors, the comments that other people make about your appearance is very hard to ignore, because they stick to you like stickers.
 
When I was conceiving of Blow It!!, I was looking for a way to combine the body and architectural sites, or the body and materials, to find a method of either expanding my movements or enveloping those things into my actions. I wanted to find an object that would stand in comparison to my small body and that is how I found out about weather balloons. Meterologists attach a camera and a parachute and filled with hydrogen to observe the weather. As the balloon goes through the air the camera takes pictures of the conditions. At some point in the atmosphere, it will burst. The camera will come down to the earth on the parachute. It’s a latex balloon. I experimented many times with the balloon, but I didn’t foresee that it would burst during my performance. When it did, everyone was alarmed. I was, too! That’s one of the fun parts of a performance. You can’t tell what the results will be, always. The object of Blow It!! was important, but what was more important was the element of control I had over the much larger object.
 
AHL: You were very scary in the performance. You were shoving the loud leafblower towards the people, possibly deliberately to be aggressive.
 
HRL: It was acting. I look people in the eye. Some of them are uncomfortable, some of them find it amusing. I observe their reactions. It’s a bit like I am holding a gun. I have short hair and boots on, so I don’t look like a feminine woman, and I’m not just there to blow up a balloon. I wanted to make actions and movements that you could examine from a different perspective. People initially stare at me and the balloon out of curiosity, then they start getting scared. Some people were covering their ears while others left the room. What’s so funny is that they were so scared but the minute I stop blowing the balloon and tied it up, the people relax again and start getting excited about the balloon, regardless of their age or gender. Just as they had started interacting with the balloon like that, in a matter of mere seconds, the balloon bursts.
 
AHL: Everyone screamed.
 
HRL: There were people screaming out of shock, but also people screaming with excitement. It’s fun to have so many different reactions. There isn’t one generalized reaction. Some people sympathized with me, others were extremely excited while some hid away. Each response was slightly different.
 
AHL: In comparison, 50 Bulbs seems extremely dangerous. Fifty members of the audience each hold a lit glass bulb which is attached to the ceiling by a long string, and they let go of it to hit you directly. The glass shatters. It feels like the set of a horror movie.
 
HRL: There are famous performance artists who have even shot at their own bodies. There are many artists who perform while their bodies are at risk, but there is a point to it. They want to deliver the tension, emotion or sensation that arises from an extreme action. It’s through the art that the tension is experienced together with the audience. 50 Bulbs is the first work I created after getting the artist visa. At the time I kept seeing the American flag everywhere. I hadn’t really noticed it in my prior visits to the States, and then after making up my mind to emigrate here, I would see the American flag in buses, in the subway and so on. It wasn’t the America I had studied in as a student. Aren’t there 50 stars in the flag? That’s why I installed the 50 bulbs, and had 50 audience members. I said hello to each person and handed them a light bulb as they entered the space. The bulb emits light and heat to the point of it being hot. If you consider it being electrified, it is rather scary. When I take risks as an artist, I consider safety to be the most important thing. If I had ignored the safety aspects to do my performance and included the audience in it, I would be making irresponsible work. The trick is, I know that it’s safe, but the audience feels its great danger. There’s another seemingly dangerous work I did, where I was sitting on the rooftop of a building (I Have Received Orders Not To Move, 2011). People who saw it were terrified. But I knew I was safe.
 
AHL: I recall Chris Burden’s Shoot, 1971. I think 50 Bulbs is similar to Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece, 1964, which transfers the responsibility to the audience. They are asked: “Can you bring yourself to throw a glass bulb at this person?” but actually, the real question is coming from the concern of the artist, which is, “Should I really be asking this person to protect me? It is scary.” It is a work that seems to come out of the tension of expressing fear against the unknown ‘you’.
 
HRL:  It is scary. The beginning of the work starts from the immigration process, but in that space and time, [what drives it] is that fear.
 
AHL: Your composition of works seem based in feminism.
 
HRL: It is important to me. The year before last, I was wondering whether we would be better off if we didn’t even have concepts such as ‘power’, ‘patriarchy’ and so forth. I’m not sure. I was wondering if because I care so much that maybe in being extremely sensitive in my reactions to something I could be unwittingly oppressing someone else with my reaction? I have the authority of being an artist, and I have my own desires and wishes to express. These thoughts disturbed me tremendously. Recently, the #MeToo movement has spread to the Korean art world and I spent a couple of nights unable to sleep thinking about it. I was in the center of the Korean artworld, I was in theater, I personally know people who have been accused of misdoings. I was teaching at school. I was that person’s student, lecturer, assistant professor. I am deeply upset by it. I felt remorse for thinking that such concepts were unnecessary and how I had been turning a blind eye to it all. The victims must be able to voice themselves, and we must go against this, but is there a better, wiser way? I am still thinking about this.
 
AHL: There is an avoidance of the body in Korean society, but is it partly due to these kinds of reflections that you decided to move to the States?
 
HRL: My personal anguish or experience expands into the public eye through my performance. I finished my studies and returned to Korea in 2012. At the time I received so much attention from my acquaintances and my teachers. At the time Korea had a boom of interdisciplinary art as it was celebrated for its breaking of boundaries in dance and theater. It was a hot developing area so my performance was perceived as unique. When my work went into the institutional realm, its format was easily accepted. But I found that hard to bear. My body, actions, the body of a woman, being a woman; when my work went back to those things, it was ostracized. Stories relating to those things were ostracized. Actually, instead of someone expressly ignoring those stories, it was more like there was no interest in those things at all. They were taboo and strange things. I didn’t have colleagues to share these stories with or collaborate together. One becomes lonely in those situations. Whether it was the theater or the art world, the hierarchical structure of the inhabitants of the worlds was very difficult for me to handle, too. Even teaching. I was very stressed in front of jurors who had come to evaluate my work to assess it for grants. I am still a bit worried about what I say, because I need to be tactful even now. It became so difficult for me to do my work, because I would keep finding myself in situations where I had to be mindful of other people’s opinions. Will this person give me an opportunity? Without it I can’t do my work, and if I get the opportunity I have to kowtow to this person’s power. It’s a structural issue for Korea’s art world, theater and film industry. I think these structural problems are what is rising to the surface now. Last year there was the issue of the cultural ‘blacklist’ [editor’s note: in 2016, it was widely reported that President Park Geun-hye’s government had blacklisted approximately 9,700 people who had either voiced their support for the opposition candidates in the coming election or had criticized the government’s handling of the Sewol ferry disaster in 2014. Those on the blacklist were removed from government-supported programs]. If you criticized the institution you were in, or satirized society from a negative point of view, you were blacklisted and couldn’t get grants. It left artists in a great quandary.
 
I can’t go into detail about every single thing that I experienced, but if you look at the overall framework, you can see why I was so uncomfortable there and why I was so stressed. I am actually reminding myself about why I came back to the States by talking about this.
 
AHL: There are some pieces in your practice that you can’t perform in Korea.
 
HRL: There are many.
 
AHL: What performances drew praise in Korea?
 
HRL: My work in Korea was mostly based on the format of theater. There are many reasons for this, but one was that unlike the States, there aren’t that many spaces dedicated to performance. The reality was that theaters were the usual venues. Another reason was that it was difficult to perform a work that relied on interaction with the audience. I also needed time to identify the tendencies of the audience who flinched from being directly inserted into the performance or would be at a loss as to how to participate in one. In 2013 I made a gesture drama of images that I made during a solo performance, called Ego, which the audience liked. In Ego, there is a violinist playing the violin while hanging upside down from the ceiling, a guy in a suit embroidering, a tortoise, a woman fighting with her ego, and her ego. I use the weather balloon I normally use in Blow It!! as the main object installed in the center of the stage. In the last scene, the woman shouts as she is blowing up the balloon, and she stops just before it bursts. The balloon takes over the stage. It’s quiet, then the lights dim. The balloon suddenly bursts! It’s the same object, and there are similar actions in the work, but it is a completely different work from Blow It!! There is no dialogue but the audience follows the visual narrative of the work.
 
AHL: I don’t know if your newer work such as We Hear Them They See Us would be able to be performed in Korea.
 
HRL: Why not?
 
AHL: I feel the audience won’t leave the performers alone. You only did works that were within the limited space of the theater stage in Korea.
 
HRL: That’s right. I had to adjust my work to fit that space. I felt very restricted.
 
AHL: In the case of your nude performances, where would those originate? I feel it may have made it difficult for you to work as a teacher. Maybe it made you agonize more over the #MeToo movement.
 
HRL: Everyone has their own set of beliefs. When what one believes clashes with one’s surroundings, you have to decide whether or not to modify your principles, or live your life according to them. Artists commonly use their principles as the foundation for their work, as something that is not exchangeable for anything else. If as someone who makes performance work based on the body and its movements I see my naked body or exposure of any part of it as an essential material to a work, then I consider it as a tool for making my work or as part of the work’s theme. I don’t think about anything else. For me to conduct a nude performance is not simply an act of exposing my body. The minute I reveal my naked body, it is not my personal body. It’s an Asian body, the body of a woman, and a body of an Asian woman in her thirties. The space and time that my performance is located in makes my body in it no longer a private body. It is a cultural and political body.
 
AHL: In that respect, would you consider that nudity is even more important? If you think of your body as an Asian woman’s body, then it becomes a representative of that. For an identity that severely lacks representation in culture, it may be important to reveal it further.
 
HRL: In my first performance, Melting Ice, 2010, I was in Chicago naked and hanging upside down from the ceiling. There were about 20 pieces of ice surrounding me, and each ice shard contained a picture of myself crying. It was about 30 minutes long, and as time passes, the audience can see the ice melting and myself hanging upside down. As I was preparing the work, I was wondering, “What should I wear?” “What should I wear to perform this? Why do I have to worry about what to wear?” It occurred to me that maybe what I was wearing wasn’t that important. So I didn’t set out to be nude, it just became a situation where it was inevitable. My skin and my body had to be revealed. There were other works I did afterwards in the nude, such as I Received Orders Not To Move. My first performance of that work was in Shanghai, and I realized that the image I projected when I was wearing something on my body was unnecessary for the work. There are works where taking things off my body, that is, the act of removing the things that were covering me was very important. Last year, I performed a work at Panoply Performance Laboratory and I didn’t manage to title it yet. The work involves me coming in drenched from head to toe. I am wearing a hat, glasses, shoes and a bag. I start with taking off my hat and hanging it on the wall and strip off everything down to my underwear to hang them up.
 
I have works that are funny. I don’t know why, but it seems hard to make humorous work. But I do want to make more of them, works that are fun, pleasant and joyful.
 
AHL: Ping and Pong, 2012, is a fun piece of work.
 
HRL: Yes, that featured my mother. My mother has been suffering from Parkinson’s disease for the past 10 years. Before she was ill, she was a very active person who enjoyed sports and had a strong body. She was an amateur table tennis player. She was great! That work was my MFA thesis. Parkinson’s disease afflicts the nervous system so one’s movements become stiff and strange. The body creates strange movements, and movements appear suddenly as part of the symptoms. I was working with my mother, and it was ridiculous to have a table tennis match between me, who had never played before, and my mother who had played it every day for over 10 years, and me who is so healthy and my mother who is sick. I can’t perform that work again. Time has passed and my mother’s condition has changed. It’s the natural course of things. That piece meant a lot to me. I didn’t explain for the performance that my mother has Parkinson’s. It was just a match between a mother and her daughter. My mother came to Chicago to train me for a month before the match. I learned table tennis from her for that time while working over how the performance should go with her. Honestly, that time I had with my mother, sharing why I was making such art, that was more important to me than the actual performance.
 
The second work I performed with my mother, Insook, 2015, was made when my mother came over to New York. I was wearing an acrylic bubble over my head and I come in carrying my mother on my back. My mother painted over my bubble with oil paint, and gradually I can’t see. Eventually, my mother tries to leave while carrying me on her back but collapses and we exit together. I can’t really explain the meaning of that work in words. We’re family, we are mother and daughter. Its meaning is indescribable. Everyone has a mother, so I think there is a wider sympathy for the work. It’s not the actions my mother did that were important, but the fact that she was there which is what matters. A Korean woman in her sixties who knows nothing about art, performance or culture came to New York to be in her daughter’s performance art. I think that’s enough to expand the private meaningfulness into something shareable by the general public.
 
As I was studying feminism, I was thinking about myself as a woman and as a female body, and it was impossible not to think about my mother. I agreed with the theories and I could think about the concept, traditions and customs that collided with me - I can definitely be part of #MeToo if I voiced my experience - and all of those things were what my mother endured and yet wholly passed on to me. You can say it was what was done in those times, but it was my mother who taught them.
 
AHL: Please tell us more about your most recent works, We Hear Them They See Us and A Humble Action To Feel the Meaninglessness.
 
HRL: I wanted to perform We Hear Them They See Us with my mother. You start by talking about what you can see in front of you, but because of the things you are saying, your perspective is getting harder to see, and then ultimately the strong sense of seeing disappears to activate the other senses - your hearing, the sensation of air on your skin - and you have to still talk about your surroundings, but now you have uncertainty because you can’t see, and that causes anxiety. I thought it would be great fun to perform this with my mother but she couldn’t be here. I still wanted to perform it. The interaction with the audience is important for this work, so what I hear, who I see, who does what all feeds into what I do. The work was performed at a gallery’s opening. It was good because there were so many people. The second time I performed the work was at Fergus McCaffrey Gallery, and there weren’t as many people, but I increased the length of the performance. The gallery was very spacious and once someone came in, they stayed near us for a while. So the interaction continued.
 
I received the grant for the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art for my proposal to create A Humble Action To Feel the Meaninglessness. I will start that work soon. My initial performance of it was while I was the LEIMAY fellow and participated in Soak Festival. I was given 15 minutes. During that time, I greet members of the audience and put a pulse oximeter on their finger. The machine makes a sound according to your heartbeat and records your heart rate and how much oxygen is delivered to your blood. It’s easily obtainable and it is very small. Each audience member’s entrance enhances the chorus of beeps generated by the oximeters. Even if no one does anything, their presence becomes a very important component of the performance. Against this sound, you can see the questions I receive when I go through U.S. immigration, my replies and the tension I experience and the actions I take. The audience is sitting in a circle around me as I perform, and the questions are projected onto the ceiling as I reply and move.
 
When I encounter these situations that make me feel the tension, it becomes a motif for my practice. Is my practice meaningful to society? Is it a truly meaningful work? I am an artist, so I work and make my art practice, but there are people at the front committed to changing the world. There are truly meaningful actions and voices. There are actions to rouse many people’s sympathy and get them to commit to meaningful change, but does it mean anything for me to say these things in the performance art arena, which no one is really interested in? That’s why I titled it ‘A Humble Action’.
 
AHL: You mentioned earlier that you find documentation to be a crucial part of performance art. Do you have plans to change how you do that for your future work?
 
HRL: I always ask someone who knows what they are doing for my performance documentation. I have to explain thoroughly my actions and what the purpose of my performance is, and really hope that my work is not distorted to the fullest extent possible through the documentation. It can only be done by someone who knows me and my work very well. But of course, the moving image and photography are very different.
 
AHL: It’s difficult to understand the context immediately in a soundless photograph.
 
HRL: With photography, at least you can ask me about the parts you didn’t understand. Then I can explain in my own voice. The problem arises when it is understood differently from my intention, if the interpretation is done from the audience’s point of view or if one is attempting to understand my work from just one photograph. Photography is a more comfortable means of documentation for me. 

2018년 2월 이희란 작가와의 인터뷰
 
알 재단: 한국의 60년대, 70년대 전위예술 내지는 행위예술가들이 잊혀지는 듯한 느낌이 드는데, 왜 그럴까요?
 
이희란:  행위는 몸이 기반이 되는데,  [한국 사회에서] 몸을 금기시 하는 인식부터 시작되는 듯 싶어요. 몸이 중심에 나서고, 여기서 나오는 행위들이 거칠 수도 있고 노골적일 수도 있고, 성에 대한 우리의 인식이 비춰지는데, 그러면 불편해요. 보기에 불편하니까 담론화 시키지 못했던 것 같아요.
 
알 재단: 연기 전공을 하셨는데, 어느 순간부터 연기를 벗어나서 행위예술을 하실 생각을 하시게 됐나요.
 
이희란: 특별한 계기는 없었어요. 점차적으로 관심이 바뀌고 어떤 작업에 더 흥미를 갖게 되는지를 보니까, 연기는 분명히 저 혼자서 할 수 없어요. 상대 배우가 있어야 하고, 연출가가 있고, 작가가 쓴 텍스트를 해석해서 연기를 하는 거니까. 저의 목소리를 내고 싶었어요. 기존의 연기 스타일이나 전통적인 무대 구성에서 벗어나서 자유롭게 제 목소리를 내는 걸 하고 싶었어요. 그러다 보니까 performance라고 하는 장르를 접하게 되고. Performance는 미술에 뿌리를 두고 있는 장르가 있고 연극에 뿌리를 두는 장르가 있는데, 자연스럽게 텍스트를 기반으로 두지 않는 사람의 몸, 몸체, 행위 또는 어떤 의식, 사고에 중심을 두는 작업들을 알게 됐어요.
 
알 재단: 예를 들면, Allan Kaprow의 해프닝들 말씀이신가요?
 
이희란: 네. 그리고 50년대, 60년대 활동했던 Open Theater 나 Living Theater 같은 연극 집단들을 보면, 배우가 작가예요. 연출가가 작가이고, 배우가 연출이고, 공동창작들이 일어나는 지점이었어요. ‘나도 이런 작업을 해보고 싶다,’ 생각했어요.
 
알 재단: 작가님 작품은 본인이 스스로 행위를 하시는데, 작가님의 몸을 굉장히 중요시하는 듯합니다.
 
이희란: 제가 생각하는 performance는 행위를 기반으로 둬요. 행위는 몸짓인데, 그 몸짓이 나의 사고, 마음, 감각에서 원인을 두고 움직이게 되는 게 중요해요. 흔히 작가들이 받는 질문 중에 “너의 inspiration이 뭐야?” “작품의 inspiration이 뭐야?”라고 많이들 하시는데, 제 작업의 시작은 나의 긴장이예요. ‘긴장'이란 게 어떤 감정적인 흥분 상태가 아니라, 나의 몸의 감각이나 나의 정서나 나의 행위의 원인이 되는 것들이에요. 예를 들면, 살면서 내가 대면하는 어떤 불편한 상황이나 사건들 -  굉장히 소소한, 사적인 공간에서도 일어날 수 있는 거고, 사적인 관계에서도 일어날 수 있는 거고, 또는 여자로서, 한국 사람으로서, 예술가로서 공적인 상황에서도 일어날 수 있는 거에요. 저를 긴장하게 만드는 것들이 있어요. 예를 들면, 공항에서 미국 입국할 때 너무 긴장 돼요. 전 죄 지은 것 없고 불법체류를 하는 것도 아닌데, 왜 그렇게 공항 입국을 힘들어하는지 모르겠어요. 또는, 권력을 가진 분을 만났을 때, 전 긴장 돼요. 분명히 그 권력이 불타당하게 저를 push하기 때문인 거죠. 권력자들 중엔 정말 돈이 많으신 분들 계시는데, 그러면 자본주의에 대해서 생각하게 되죠. 그 권력자가 남자라면, 여성의 권위에 대해서 자연스럽게 생각하게 되고요. 자꾸 파고 들면, 나를 움직이는 힘은 ‘긴장'이에요. 그 모티브를 확장 시키는 거죠.
 
알 재단: 작품을 구성하실 때, 그 긴장을 재연하는 것보다는 소화를 해서 다른 모습으로 표현하시는 듯 합니다. 관중의 반응에 유의하시나요?
 
이희란: 관객이 정말 중요해요. 처음 작업을 시작했을 땐, 사실 관객을 중요하게 여기지 않았어요. 제 행위가 더 중요했어요. 그런데 시간이 지나다 보니, 제가 만든 행위, 제가 배치한 오브제, 주워진 시간과 공간이 충돌해서 환경이 이뤄지는데, 관객이 그냥 목격자가 되지는 않아요. 관객의 반응이 분명히 있는데, 그 반응이 제가 처음 작업을 시작했을 때 갖고 있던 긴장이예요. 어떤 호기심이라고도 말할 수 있는데, 관객의 정서, 감각, 행동을 자극시키는 원인이 그 긴장이예요. 제 긴장이 관객의 긴장이 돼요. 그래서 계속 생각하게 돼요. 어떻게 하면 관객을 적극적으로 제 작업에 참여 시켜서 관객의 참여가 그 작품을 완성시킬 수 있을까?
 
알 재단: 작가님의 첫 작품 중 In Braids, 2011,를 보면, 본인의 몸을 굉장히 제한된 공간인 계단에서 3시간 동안 혼자 performing 하신 거죠. 관객이 할 수 있는 일이 제한됐었죠, 반응도 어느 정도 제한된 듯하고요. 그러나 작가님의 최근 작품들은 관객이 없으면 이뤄질 수가 없는 작업들이네요.
 
이희란: 관객의 참여가 중요한 이유가 performance의 특성이예요. 똑같은 행위의 반복은 있을 수 없어요. 관객의 반응도 행위예요. 반복이 될 수가 없어요. 같은 강물에 발을 담글 수 없듯이. 시간이 계속 흐르니까. 시간이 계속 흐르니까. 시간이 계속 흐르니까. 제가 똑같은 말을 반복해도 이 말들은 다 다른 말들이 돼요. 작업이 재공연 될 때, 다른 공연이라는 걸 제가 자각하고 이 작업에 저의 생각을 담고 싶었어요. 저한테는 여기, 지금 있는 당신이 이 작업의 collaborator라는 저의 생각을 관객에게 더 알려주고 싶었어요.
 
알 재단: 작가님의 작업 중 인기있는 50 Bulbs, 2015,와  Blow It!! 2012, 에 대해서 얘기하고 싶은데요, 사실 두 작품 다 굉장히 관객한테는 불편한 작품들인데, 왜 인기를 누릴까요? Blow It!!의 경우 leafblower를 써서 시끄럽고 냄새 나고, 풍선을 공간 꽉 차게 계속 부시고, 편한 구석 하나 없는 작업입니다. 재연 되는 이유가 뭘까요? 작가님께서는 어떤 생각으로 구성하셨어요?
 
이희란: 그 때 저는 제 몸에 대해서 고민이 많았어요. 제 몸을 봤어요. Asian의 몸이라고. 이건 한국에 있을 땐 생각을 못했어요. 여기서는 제가 이방인이기 때문에 뭔가 다르기 때문에 당시에 고민이 됐던 거예요. 2010년 쯤이에요. 학교 다닐 때 페니미즘 공부하면서 날이 서 있을 때였죠. 저는 평균 신장보다 키가 작아요. 동글동글하게 생겼다는 얘기를 들어요. 그래서 제가 듣는 이야기는 ‘귀엽다,’ ‘여자같은 여자', 그런 얘기들을 연기자였을 때 정말 많이 들었어요. 특히 여배우한테는 다른 사람들이 자신의 외형을 보고 하는 말들이 스티커처럼 붙죠. 쉽게 극복되지 않아요. ‘
 
Blow it!! 을 구성했을 당시, 몸과 objects, 몸과 architectural sites, 몸과 Materials을 결합해서, 제 아주 작고 단순한 저의 몸짓을 확장시키거나 또는 그것들을 저의 행위 안으로 포함시키는 방법을 모색했었어요. 작은 제 체구와 대조를 이를 수 오브제를 찾았던 중weather balloon이란 걸 알게 됐어요. 날씨를 관측하는 과학자들이 카메라와 낙하산을 함께 달아서 수소 채워서 띄우는 거에요. 대기층에 올라가면서 카메라가 기상을 기록해요. 어느 정도 대기층에 올라가면 터지죠. 카메라는 낙하산을 타고 내려와요. Latex 풍선이예요. 그 풍선 갖고 실험을 여러 번 했어요. 그런데 [작업 중에] 그 풍선이 터질 거라고는 예상하지 못했어요. 그게 터질 때 사람들이 다 경악했죠. 저도 그 중의 한 명이었어요. 이 게 performance의 재미있는 요소 중의 하나예요. 예상치 못 한 결과가 나올 수 있다는거요. Blow it!! 작품에서 저는 그 오브제도 중요했지만, 커다란 오브제를 컨트롤 하는 저의 action이 더 중요했어요.
 
알 재단: 작가님 그 때 굉장히 무섭게 나타나세요. 시끄러운 leafblower를 다른 사람들한테 들이 대면서. 일부러 위협적으로 하신 것 같아요.
 
이희란: 연기죠. 그러면서 관객들과 눈 마주쳐요. 관객들은 불쾌해하기도 하고, 재미있어하기도 하고, 그 반응을 살펴요. 마치 총을 든 것 같은 거죠. 짧은 머리에 부츠,  여성스러운 여자가 아니고 그냥 풍선을 부는 여자가 아니라 다른 시각에서 볼 수 있는 행위와 몸짓을 만들어보고 싶었어요. 풍선도, 사람들이 처음에는 호기심으로 바라보다가 나중에는 공포에 질리게 되죠. 귀를 막는 사람들도 있었고, 중간에 도망 나간 사람들도 있었고. 너무 재미있는 거는, 그렇게 공포에 질려 있다가 제가 더 이상 부는 걸 멈추면, 풍선에 매듭을 지으면, 많은 사람들이 다시 릴렉스하면서 ‘와, 풍선이다!’ 하면서 남녀노소 불문하고 좋아해요. 그렇게 풍선과 interaction을 시작한 지 몇 초 안돼서 터진 거예요.
 
알 재단: 사람들이 소리 질렀죠.
 
이희란: ‘으악' 하고 소리 지르는 사람도 있었지만, ‘와’하고 좋아하는 사람도 있었어요. 그런 다양한 반응이 재미있어요. 반응이 일반적인게 아니라 달라요. 같이 공감하거나, 어떤 사람들은 극도로 흥분해서 즐기고 어떤 사람들은 숨고. 받아들이는 모습들이 조금씩 달라요.
 
알 재단: 반면, 50 Bulbs는 굉장히 위험한 performance 같아요. 50명의 관중이 각각 천장에 끈으로 맨 켜진 유리전구를 드는데, 그 걸 놓으면 작가님을 바로 유리전구로 치게 되죠.  그러면서 유리가 부서지죠. 세트가 공포영화 같았어요.
 
이희란: 간혹 유명한 performance artist 중에 자신의 몸에 총을 쏘기도 한 사람도 있죠. 많은 작가들이 자신의 몸을 risk해서 작업을 하는데, 그 이유가 분명히 있어요. 과격한 행위를 통해서 원인이 되는 나의 긴장/정서/감각을 전달하고 싶은 거예요. 예술이라는 형태로 그 긴장을 관객과 함께 경험하고 싶어하는 거죠. 50 Bulbs는 제가 미국에 아티스트 비자로 처음 와서 했던 작업인데, 그 당시 제 눈에 미국 국기가 그렇게 많이 보이더라고요. 그 전엔 미국에 다니더라도 못 봤는데요. 이주를 결심하니까, 버스, 지하철 칸 칸 마다 미국 국기가 보이기 시작하는 거예요. 제가 학생 신분으로 공부했던 미국이 아닌 거죠. 국기에 별이 50개 있잖아요? 그래서 50개의 전구를 설치 했고, 50명의 관객이 있었죠. 제가 그 관객들이 입장할 때 일일이 인사하고 전구를 하나씩 전달해요. 전구는 빛이 있고 뜨거울 정도의 온기도 있어요. 이게 전기라고 생각하면 정말 무서워요. [작가로서] risk-taking을 할 때, 저는 안전성을 가장 중요하게 생각해요. 만약 제가 그 안전성을 무시하고 어떤 행위를 할 경우, 거기에 관객을 참여시킨다면 저는 책임감 없는 작업을 하는 거죠. 그런데, 저는 안전하다는 걸 아는 데, 보는 사람들은 굉장히 위험하다고 느끼는 거죠. 또 다른 위험했던 작품은 제가 건물 옥상에 등 지고 앉아 있던 작업이었어요 (I Have Received Orders Not To Move, 2011). 그 작업도 다른 사람들이 보기에는 아찔한 작업이었죠. 그렇지만 저는 제가 안전하다는 걸 알고 있었어요.
 
알 재단: Chris Burden의 Shoot, 1971,를 생각하신 것 같은데, 50 Bulbs는 Yoko Ono의 Cut Piece, 1964, 처럼 관객에 책임을 전가하는 작품이죠. 관객한테 질문을 던지죠: “네가 과연 이 사람을 향해 유리전구를 던질 수 있겠냐?” 그런데 사실 그 질문은 작가님의 우려에서 나오는 거죠: “내가 과연 이 사람들한테 보호를 부탁할 수 있을까? 겁이 난다.” ‘너'에 대한 겁을 표현하는, 그 긴장감에서 나오는 작품 같아요.
 
이희란: 맞아요. 겁이 나죠. 처음에 시작은 이민 과정에서 시작됐지만, 그 공간 안에서, 그 시간에선 그렇죠.
 
알 재단: 작가님의 작품 구성은 페미니즘을 바탕으로 하는 것 같은데요.
 
이희란: 저에게는 중요해요. 재작년 쯤,‘권력’ ‘남성중심’등의 개념이 아예 존재하지 않는 세상이라면, 오히려 우리가 훨씬 더 행복하지 않을까, 그런 생각을 했었어요. 잘 모르겠어요. 내가 너무 care해서, 나조차도 어디선가 굉장히 예민하게 반응하고, 나의 반응이 그 누군가한테는 권력으로 또는 권위로 느껴지지 않을까. 난 예술가로서의 권위로 이런 걸 하는 사람이고, 또는 나의 욕심, 욕망, 나를 드러내고 싶어하는 마음이 있는데. 이런 것들이 상통하면서 저를 굉장히 괴롭혔어요. 최근의 #MeToo 운동이 한국의 문화예술계 전반에 펼쳐지면서 제가 그것 때문에 며칠 잠을 못 잤어요. 저도 그 중심에 섰던 사람이었고, 연극계에 있었고, 성추행을 저지른 가해자를 개인적으로 알기도 하고, 학교에 몸 담고 있었어요. 그 사람의 학생, 조교, 강사였고.  굉장히 속상해요. 한 때 내가 개념이 필요 없고 아무것도 몰라, 아무것도 없어라고 생각했던 그 시간들을 다시 반성하게 됐어요. 그 목소리를 내야하고, 무조건 맞서야 하는데, 뭔가 더 현명한 방법, 지혜로운 방법으로 어떻게 맞설 수 있을까. 그런 생각들을 계속하고 있어요.
 
알 재단: 몸에 대한 회피가 한국 사회 전반에 있기도 하지만, 혹시 이런 것에 대한 문제 의식 때문에 미국에 오시게 됐나요?
 
이희란: 저의 사적인 고민들이나 경험들이 제가 만들어낸 행위에서 공적으로 확장되지요. 여기서 공부를 마치고 한국으로 돌아갔을 때가 2012년이였어요. 그 때 저의 지인들에게, 선생님들에게 관심을 많이 받았어요. 그 당시 한국에 다원 예술, 융합 예술이라고 해서 장르의 경계가 없는, 그 경계를 넘어서는 무용과 연극이 한창 hot했고 부흥하던 시기여서 제 performance가 unique하게 받아졌어요. 어떤 제도권 안으로 들어갔을 때, 제 작품 형식이 잘 받아들여졌어요. 그런데 그게 참 어렵더라고요. 나의 몸, 몸짓, 여자의 몸, 여자, 그런 것들로 돌아갔을 때, 외면 당했어요. 그런 이야기들이 외면 당했어요. 사실 그걸 누군가가 노골적으로 외면했던 것 보다는 아예 그런 것에 대한 관심 자체가 없었어요. 금기시되고, 이상하고, 이상한 거예요. 이런 이야기를 함께 공유하고 함께 작업을 만들 수 있는 동료도 없는 거예요. 그럼 외로워지는 거죠. 한국의 연극계든, 미술계든, 문화예술계의 수직구조의 구성원들의 관계도 저를 굉장히 힘들게 만들었어요. 학교에서 강의를 해도. 저에게는 제 작업을 소개하는 자리였고, 그 작업을 평가하시는 - 그러니까 지원금을 주냐 마냐하는 - 평가단 앞에서도 굉장히 긴장됐고. 지금도 걱정을 하고 있어요. 눈치를 봐야하니까, 내가 하는 말에. 그러니까 작업하기가 너무 힘든거에요, 남의 눈치를 보면서 작업을 해야하는 상황들이 자꾸 펼쳐지니까. 이 사람이 나한테 기회를 주느냐 마느냐. 기회를 안 주면 난 작업을 할 수 없고, 기회를 주면 이 사람의 권력에 복종해야하고. 한국의 미술작가, 연극 연출가, 영화계 전반의 구조적인 문제예요. 그 구조적인 문제들이 지금 다 터진 거죠. 작년에는 문화계의 blacklist가 문제였고. 내가 소속된 조직, 사회를 비판적인 시각에서 바라보고 풍자하거나 부정하면 blacklist되고 지원금에서 제외되고. 작가들이 굉장히 고민에 빠지죠.
 
제가 경험했던 일들을 일일이 다 나열할 순 없지만 그 전체적인 구조만 보아도 내가 왜 그렇게 그 안에서 불편했는지, 왜 긴장했는지 알 수 있어요. 지금 저는 너무나 공감하고 내가 왜 다시 미국으로 왔는지 스스로 설득당했고.
 
알 재단: 이작가님 작품 중에서 한국에선 할 수 없는 게 몇 개 있네요.
 
이희란: 많아요.
 
알 재단: 한국에서는 어떤 작품들이 반응 좋았어요?
 
이희란: 한국에서 작업은 대부분 연극 형식을 기반으로 한 작업들을 했어요. 여러가지 이유가 있는데, 미국처럼 퍼포먼스 전용 예술공간이 많지 않아요. 주어진 venue가 극장인 경우가 많이 있었구요, 또 다른 이유는 관객과의 인터렉션이  중요한 퍼포먼스 작업이 쉽지 않았어요. 작품에 직접 개입하는것을 매우 꺼려하거나 익숙치 않아서 어찌할 바 모르는 관객들의 동향을 살피는데 어느정도 시간이 필요하기도 했구요. 2013년에 솔로 퍼포먼스를 하면서 만들어낸 이미지들을 엮어서 Ego 라는 gesture drama 를 만들었는데, 많은 관객들이 좋아해주셨어요. Ego에는 거꾸로 천장에 매달린채로 바이올린을 연주하는 바이올린 리스트, 공연시간 내내 무심한듯 자수를 놓는 수트입은 남자, 거북이 한마리,  자신의 ego와 싸우는 여자, 그리고 그 여자의 Ego 가 등장해요. Blow it!! 에서 사용했던 weather balloon이 무대 중앙에 메인 오브제로 설치되었어요. 마지막 장면에서 여자 퍼포머가 소리를 지르며 blower로 커다란 풍선을 불다가 떠지기 직전까지 멈추어요. 풍선이 극장 무대 전체를 채우죠. 한동안 정적이 흐르고 서서히 암전이 되는 순간 풍선이 떠져요. 같은 오브제를 사용하고 비슷한 행위들로 공연이 이루어졌지만 Blow it!!과는 전혀 다른 작품으로 완성되었어요. 대사는 없지만 관객들은 visual narrative를 따라가며 작품을 이해하죠.
 
알 재단: We Hear Them They See Us 같은 최신작은 한국에선 할 수가 없을 것 같은데요.
 
이희란: 왜요?
 
알 재단: 관개들이 performer를 가만히 놔 두질 않을 것 같아요. 이작가님 한국에서 하신 작품들은 제한된 공간, 곧 연극 무대에서만 하셨더라고요.
 
이희란: 맞아요. 그 공간에 맞춰서 작업을 만들어야 하죠. 제가 굉장히 소심해지는 것 같아요.
 
알 재단: 작가님의 누드 작품들의 경우, 작가님의 어디에서 나오는 걸까요? 그것들을 하면서 작가님의 교수 활동이 상당히 힘들었을 것 같은데, 그런 것들 때문에 #MeToo 운동에 대해서 더 심각하게 고민하셨을 것 같습니다.
 
이희란: 누구나 자신의 신념이 있어요. 이 신념과 내가 소속된 환경이 맞지 않을 때, 나의 신념을 굽히느냐, 또는 내 신념대로 나의 삶을 가느냐, 결정하는 경우들이 있는데, 예술가에게 작품의 바탕이 되는 신념은 그 무엇과도 바꿀 수 없는 경우가 많잖아요. 몸과 행위를 기반으로 하는 퍼포먼스 작업을 하면서 나의 나체 또는 신체의 일부의 노출이 작품에 필수적인 material 이라면, 내가 사용하는 작업의 도구 또는 내가 다루는 작업의 theme 이외에 다른 생각들은 더이상 하지 않아요. 왜냐하면 저한테 누드 performance는 단순히 나의 몸을 노골적으로 드러내는 작업은 아니예요. 나의 나체가 드러나는 순간, 나의 몸이 내 개인의 몸이 아니예요. 아시안의 몸이고, 여자의 몸이고, 30대 아시안 여자의 몸이 되는 거지요. Performance가 일어나는 그 공간/시간에 제 몸은 더이상 private body가 아니에요. 그 몸은 cultural body이고, political body라고 생각해요.
 
알 재단: 그런 면에서 노출이 더 중요하다고 생각하세요? 아시안 여자의 몸이라고 생각하면, 그걸 대표하는 몸이 되잖아요. 그렇게 생각하면, representation이 별로 없는 아시안 여자로서는 더 보이는 게 중요한 면도 있잖아요.
 
이희란: 제 첫번째 performance, Melting Ice 는 2010년 시카고에서 했던 건데, 발가벗은 채로 공중에 거꾸로 매달려 있었어요. 20여개의 얼음 조각들이 저를 둘러싸고 있었고, 각각의 얼음 조각 속에서는 울고있는 표정의 제 얼굴 사진이 들어있었어요. 30분짜리 공연이었는데 시간이 흐르면서 얼음이 녹아 내렸고 관객들은 가까이서 녹아내리는 얼음과 거꾸로 매달린 퍼포머를 목격했어요. 그 작업을 준비하면서 ‘공연 중에 뭘 입어야되지?’라는 생각을 했어요. ‘뭘 입고 이 공연을 해야되지? 난 왜 이 고민을 하고 있지?’라고 생각이 되더라고요. ‘뭘 입는 게 뭐가 그렇게 중요해?’ 그래서 일부러 누드가 아니라, 누드일 수 밖에 없는 작업이였어요. 나의 살과 나의 몸이 어떻게 생겼는지 드러내야 할 수 밖에 없었어요. 그 이후에 누드로 했던 작업들, I Received Orders Not To Move 의 경우 처음에는 누드로 상해에서 했는데, 내가 뭔가 내 몸에 걸쳤을 때 이것이 주는 이미지, 느낌이 저한테는 불필요했던 거죠. 옷을 벗는, 저를 감싸고 있는 것들을 벗겨내는 행위 자체가 중요했던 공연도 있었어요. 재작년 Panoply Performance Laboratory에서 했던 작업인데, 아직 제목도 못 붙였어요. 그 땐 제가 머리부터 발끝까지 온몸이 홀딱 물로 젖은 상태로 등장을 해요. 모자, 안경, 신발, 가방 다 하고. 모자부터 시작해서 마지막으로 속옷까지 다 하나씩 벗어서 벽에 거는 행위를 했어요.
 
제 작업 중에 일부러 재미있게 한 작업들이 몇 개 있어요. 왜 그런지 모르겠는데, 그렇게 재미있고 유머러스한 작업들이 잘 나오질 않더라고요. 그런데 하고 싶어요, 재미있게, 유쾌하게, 즐겁게.
 
알 재단: Ping and Pong, 2012은 재미있는 작품인데요.
 
이희란: 네, 제 엄마예요. 엄마가 10년째 파킨슨병을 앓고 계세요. 투병하시기 전에 굉장히 활동적이고 스포츠를 좋아하시고 강한 신체를 가지셨던 분이셨어요. 아마추어 탁구 선수였어요. 정말 잘 치셨어요. 그 작업이 제 MFA 졸업 공연이었는데, 파킨슨병은 운동신경에 이상이 생겨서 움직임이 둔해지고, 이상한 움직임이 생겨요. 그 몸에서 이상한 행위들, 행동들이 막 나오는 그런 증상들이 있어요. 엄마와 함께 작업을 하는데, 10년 넘게 탁구를 매일 쳤던 엄마와 한 번도 탁구를 쳐 본 적이 없는 저와, 투병 중인 엄마 그리고 난 아주 건강한데 ‘엄마와의 대결’이라고 해서 말도 안 되는 핑퐁 플레이를 했죠. 그 작업, 지금은 못해요. 시간이 지났고, [우리 엄마의] 상태도 변했고. 어쩌면 그게 순리일 수도 있어요. 그게 순리이죠. 저한테는 굉장히 의미 있는 작업이예요. 그걸 하면서 굳이 엄마가 파킨슨병이 있다고 말하지 않았어요. 그냥 엄마와 딸의 대결이었어요. 그 공연이 있기 전에 엄마가 한 달 전에 시카고에 와서 저에게 탁구를 가르쳐줬어요. 그래서 저는 한 달 동안 엄마한테서 레슨을 받았고, 저는 엄마에게 퍼포먼스가 이렇게 저렇게 될 거니까 우리는 이렇게 저렇게 해야 된다는 performing을 엄마와 고민을 했고. 저한테는 사실 그 핑퐁 공연보다는 그 한 달 동안 엄마와 공유했던, 내가 왜 이런 art work를 만들고 있는지, 그런 것들을 공유하는 시간이 더 중요했어요.
 
엄마와 함께 했던 두 번째 작업, Insook, 2015 작품은 엄마가 뉴욕에 오셨을 때 만든 작업인데, [아크릴 버블을 머리에 쓰고] 제가 엄마를 업고 등장을 해서, 엄마가 유성 페인트를 제 버블에 칠하고, 점점 제 시야가 가려지고, 나중에 엄마가 저를 업고 퇴장하려다가 저를 업지 못하고 무너지고 함께 퇴장하는 작업이었어요. 그 의미를 제가 어떻게 말로 표현할 수 있겠어요. 가족이고, 엄마와 딸이고. 작업을 설명하면서 이 마음을 다루기엔 너무 의미가 깊은 것 같아요. 누구나 다 엄마가 있기 때문에 공감할 거라고 생각해요. 여기선 엄마의 어떤 행위가 중요한 게 아니고, 나의 작업에 엄마가 있어준 걸로 많은 부분을 차지한다고 생각해요. 아무것도 모르는, 예술/퍼포먼스/미술이 뭔지 모르는 60세의 한국 여성이 뉴욕에서 퍼포먼스 아트를 하고 있는 딸의 작품에 being한, 그 걸로 전 충분히 어떤 사적인 의미가 공적으로 확장될 수 있을 거라고 생각해요.
 
Feminism 공부를 할 때, 나, 여자, 또는 나의 몸에 대해서 생각을 하면서, 피할 수 없었던 게 우리 엄마였어요. 그 공부를 하면서 거기에 공감하고, 나와 충돌했던 개념들, 기존의 관례/관습들 - 나는 지금 목소리 낼 수 있어요, #미투 할 수 있어요 - 그 것들을 다 감수하고 그 것들을 고스란히 저한테 가정교육 시켜 준 건 우리 엄마잖아요. 그 시대엔 다 그랬다 하지만, 그 게 엄마라고 생각하지 않을 수가 없더라고요.
 
알재단:  2017 작품 We Hear Them They See Us 그리고 A Humble Action To Feel the Meaninglessness에 대해서 말씀해주세요.
 
이희란: We Hear Them They See Us의 작업은 사실 엄마랑 하고 싶었어요. 그 작업은, 눈앞에 보이는 것에 대해서 말을 하고, 그 말 때문에 점점 시야가 가려지는데, 우리의 가장 강한 감각인 시각이 사라졌을 때 다른 감각들이 발동해서 - 청력이라던가 공기 밀도에 민감해져서 촉각이라든가 - 그 주변에 대해서 이야기를 해야하는데, 그러면 불확실함 때문에 일어나는 불안감, 그런 것들이 드러나요. 엄마랑 이런 작업을 하면 재미있겠다라고 생각했는데 오실 수 없었어요. 그래도 하고 싶었어요. 그 작업은 관객들의 interaction이 중요해서 내가 무엇을 듣고, 누구를 보고, 누가 어떤 행위를 했고 등의 관객들의 행위가 저희 행위가 되죠. 그 작업을 작은 갤러리의 전시 오프닝에서 했어요. 오프닝엔 관객들이 많아서 괞찮았어요. 두번째 했을 땐 Fergus McCaffrey Gallery에서 했는데, 관객이 많진 않았는데 [공연] 시간이 길었어요. 갤러리의 공간이 넓었기 때문에 관객이 한 번 들어오면 저희 곁에 오래 머물러 줬어요. 그래서 interaction을 계속 했죠.
 
A Humble Action To Feel the Meaninglessness의 프로포즈로 Franklin Furness Fund의 상을 받았어요. 조만간 작업을 할거예요. LEIMAY에서 주최한 Soak Festival에서 제가 작년 LEIMAY fellow였을 때 처음 했는데, 저한테 주어진 15분동안 제가 관객들과 한 명 한 명 인사하면서 그들 손가락에 맥박산소계측기(pulse oximeter)를 끼웠어요. 내 심장이 뛰는 대로 삑삑 소리가 나고, 심장 박동수와 심장에 산소가 얼마만큼 있는지 그 수치가 기록되는 거죠. 쉽게 구할 수 있어요. 아주 작아요. 관객들의 심장소리가 한 명 한 명 입장할 때 마다 삑 삑 소리가 나요. 관객들이 어떤 행동을 하지 않고 가만히 앉아 있어도 그들의 존재 자체가 퍼포먼스의 중요한 구성 요소가 되죠. 제가 미국에 입국할 때 immigration을 통과하면서 받는 질문들과 그 것에 대한 저의 대답, 그 것에 대한 저의 긴장, 그걸로 인한 저의 행위들이 이 안에서 이뤄졌어요. 관객들은 들어와서 저의 행위가 시작하면 원을 그리면서 저를 둘러싸고 서 있고, 관객들의 심장 박동 소리가 공간 내에 울리고, immigration 질문들은 천장에 projection으로 비춰지고 저는 그것에 대한 대답과 행위를 하죠.
 
내가 일상에서 나를 긴장하게 만드는 이런 사건들을 접할 때, 그게 어떤 모티브가 돼서 제가 예술 활동을 하잖아요. 이 예술 활동이 우리 사회에 얼마만큼 의미가 있을까? 이게 정말 의미 있는 일일까? 나는 예술가이기 때문에 작업을 하고 예술 작품을 만드는데, 세상을 바꾸기 위해서 전면에 나서는 사람들도 있잖아요. 정말 의미있는 행위들, 목소리들이 있는데. 많은 사람들의 공감을 얻고 많은 사람들의 변화된 행위를 일으키는 그런 것도 있는데. 아무도 관심없는 퍼포먼스 아트에서 내가 이런 이야기를 해봤자, 이게 의미가 있을까? 그래서 ‘a humble action’으로 제목을 붙였어요.
 
알재단: 앞서 performance art에서 documentation이 굉장히 중요하다고 말씀하셨는데, 앞으로 다른 방법으로 하실 생각이 있으세요?
 
이희란: Performance documentation을 할 때, 그것에 대해서 잘 아시는 분에게 부탁을 해요. 저의 액션을 충분히 설명을 해요, 이 performance를 할 때 제 의도가 뭣인지, 그래서 최대한 왜곡되지 않게 작업이 기록되길 바라죠. 절 잘 알고 제 작업을 잘 아는 사람이어야 해요. 그렇지 않으면 동영상으로 남기지 않고 사진으로만 남겨요. 그런데 동영상과 사진이 굉장히 다르죠.
 
알재단: 사진은 일단 소리가 없으니까 그 상황 판단이 쉽게 되지 않죠.
 
이희란: 사진은 그래서 궁금한 부분을 저한테 물어보면 되죠. 그러면 제가 저의 목소리로 대답할 수 있어요. 저의 의도와 다르게, 해석의 의도가 관객의 입장으로 해석을 하는 건지, 아니면 사진 한 장을 보고  저의 의도와 다른 방향으로 이해하신다면 문제가 있죠. 사진이 오히려 documentation으로는 더 편해요.
 
-  끝  -
Interview and translation by Jeong-A Kim, 2017-18 Archive Research Fellow
February 2018



Featured Artworks


Loading...